NSE Depreciates By 2.35% Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

The Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) depreciated further last week by 2.35% amid fast-spreading COVID-19.

The number of infected persons increases day-by-day in the country, having a negative impact on the economy, as more businesses continue to shut down out of fear of the deadly disease.

In a bid to curb the spread, the government banned the gathering of a large number of people which affects malls and others.

The market capitalisation of listed equities declined by N278 billion from N11.846 trillion recorded in the previous week to N11.568 trillion last week.

NSE All-Share index dipped by 534.92 basis points from 22,733.35 bps it closed in the previous week to 22,198.43 bps last week. Bringing the year-to-date decline to 17.30 percent and total decline in the month of March stood at 15.33 percent at the end of the week.

Last week, 35 stocks closed in the red, up from the 2 recorded a week earlier. Also, 27 stocks closed in the red, lower than the 64 filed a week ago.

Total shares of 2.804 billion valued at N32.559 billion were exchanged in 31,715 transactions during the week compared to a week earlier when 3.964 billion shares worth N43.703 billion were traded in 26,054 deals.

In terms of volume traded, the financial services sector led with 2.508 billion shares valued at N25.292 billion shares exchanged in 23,243 transactions. This was followed by the conglomerates sector with 60.873 million shares valued at N105.948 million but traded in 767 transactions.

The services sector came third with a total turnover of 51.296 million shares valued at N117.545 million in 350 deals.

Zenith Bank Plc, Guaranty Trust Bank Plc and FBN Holdings led the most traded stocks by volume with a combined share of 1.635 billion valued at N21.282 billion in 15,631 deals.

Comments

comments

For information on Press Releases, Photos, Promotional Events and Adverts, Please Call or Send a Text to 08092220500, 08098600038 or send an email to: info@aledeh.com
Loading...

Related Articles

Close